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Do You Need A Special License to Drive an RV

Are you interested in buying or renting an RV, but wondering if you need a special license? What classes require a special license? Each state is going to vary along with what type of RV you are interested in. A broad answer to that question is: you don’t need a special license for most motorhomes, unless you are going big probably not! Check out the requirements below according to your state.

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Current Overview According to current DMV laws, in all 50 states if you are driving a vehicle under 26,000 pounds which most RV classes are or towing under 10,000 pounds you are okay to drive with your regular drivers license. Vehicles that passenger 16 people of weigh over the required weights will be subject to special licensing.

Class A Weight Range: 13,000-30,000 pounds


Class B Weight Range: 6,000-8,000 pounds


Class C Weight Range: 10,000-12,000 pounds

Check out the all different types of camper here!

Types of License

In this case you only have to worry about two types of license, commercial and non commercial. Some states may require a non-commercial special license, some require a commercial license (CDL) which most tractor trailers drivers or bus driver use. For more types of driver's license click HERE

States requirements

Let’s look at state requirements and what restrictions there are for driving a larger RV.


2020 DMV regulations: states that require a non commercial special license include

  • California: Class B license required over 26,000 lb or over 40 feet; Class A license required for towing over 10,000 lbs

  • Maryland: Class B license required over 26,000 lb

  • Michigan: Recreational Double “R” Endorsement required to tow a fifth wheel plus a trailer (it’s unlikely that you’ll ever need this)

  • North Carolina: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class A license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Nevada: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class A license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb; “J” Endorsement required to tow a vehicle over 10,000 lb (if the combined weight is less than 26,000 lb)

  • New York: Recreational Vehicle or “R” endorsement required for vehicles over 26,000 lb

  • Pennsylvania: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; equired for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • South Carolina: Class E license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class F license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Texas: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class A license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Wyoming: Class B license required for vehicle over 26,000 lb and towing under 10,000 lb; Class A license required for vehicle over 26,000 lb and towing over 10,000 lb

2020 DMV regulations: states that require a commercial drivers license (CDL) include:

  • Arkansas: CDL required for vehicle over 26,000 lb

  • Connecticut: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Hawaii: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Kansas: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • New Mexico: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Washington, D.C.: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Wisconsin: CDL required over 45 feet

States That Do Not Require a sSpecial License Include:

Alabama (Ala. Code § 32-6-49.7) Montana (§ 61-1-101, MCA.)

Alaska (AS § 28.90.990) Nebraska (Neb. Rev. Stat. § 60-465)

Arizona (Ark. Code § 28-3102) New Hampshire (N.H. § Saf-C 1801.02)

Colorado (Colo. Rev. Stat. § 42-2-402) New Jersey (N.J. Rev. Stat § 39:3-10.11)

Delaware (Del. Admin. Code tit. 2 § 2213) North Dakota (N.D.C.C. § 39-06.2-06)

Florida (Fla. Stat. § 332.53) Ohio (Ohio Rev. Code § 4506.3)

Georgia (OCGA § 40-5-142) Oklahoma (47 O.S. § 1-107.4)Idaho (I.C. § 49-302)

Oregon (Or. Rev. Stat § 801.208) Illinois (625 ILCS § 5/6-500)

Rhode Island (31 R.I. Gen. Laws § 10.3-16) Indiana (CDL Manual)

South Dakota (S.D. Codified Laws § 32-9-3) Iowa (Iowa Code §321.176A)

Tennessee (T.C.A § 55-50-102) Kentucky (KRS § 281A-050 and CDL Manual)

Utah (Utah Code § 53-3-102) Louisiana ( LSA-RS § 32:408)

Vermont (23 V.S.A § 39-4103) Maine (29A M.R.S § 1252 and CDL manual)

Virginia (Code § 46.2-341.4) Massachusetts (DMV.org)

Washington (RCW 46 25-050) Minnesota (Minn. Stat. § 169.011 or driver’s manual)

West Virginia (W. Va. Code § 17E-1) Mississippi (Miss. Code § 63-1-203)

Missouri (MO Rev Stat § 302.775)


Still unsure?

When in doubt or need more information contact your local DMV to figure out what requirements are in your state when driving your RV.


By Latchit


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