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Do You Need A Special License to Drive an RV

Updated: Mar 14

Are you interested in buying or renting an RV, but wondering if you need a special license? What classes require a special license? Read on to learn more.


Driving license for RV

Ready to take on the open road but not sure if you need a special license to drive an RV? Worry not, in this blog we will outline the driving requirements for RVs of all sizes. We will also take a look at the driving license requirements for different states and types of RVs.


Technically, you don’t need a special license for most motorhomes, unless you are going big! Check out the requirements below according to your state.



Standard Driving License for RVs Up to 26,000 lbs

In most states, you can breathe a sigh of relief. If your RV's Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) falls under 26,000 pounds, your trusty standard driver's license will likely suffice. GVWR, for the uninitiated, refers to the maximum weight your RV can legally reach when fully loaded with passengers, cargo, and all-important camping gear. Many RVs, particularly smaller and mid-sized models, fall within this weight range.

Class A motorhome

Class A Weight Range: 13,000-30,000 pounds


Class B motorhome

Class B Weight Range: 6,000-8,000 pounds


Class C motorhome

Class C Weight Range: 10,000-12,000 pounds


Special License for Heavyweight RVs Over 26,000 lbs

If your RV boasts a GVWR exceeding 26,000 pounds, you might need to upgrade to a special non-commercial driver's license. The specific license class varies by state. Some states require a Class B license, while others have a separate non-commercial Class C designation specifically for RVs.


Commercial Driving License for RVs vs Non-Commercial Driving Licence for RVs

The key difference between a commercial and non-commercial license for RVs boils down to weight:


Non-Commercial License: Valid for most RVs. You can typically drive an RV with a non-commercial license if its Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) is 26,000 pounds or less. This covers most smaller and mid-sized RVs.


Commercial Driver's License (CDL): Required for heavier RVs. You'll likely need a CDL if your RV's GVWR exceeds 26,000 pounds. This applies to large motorhomes and some heavy-duty travel trailers. The specific CDL class depends on the exact weight and configuration of your RV.


For more types of driver's licenses click HERE.



RV Driving License Requirements by State

Let’s look at state requirements and restrictions for driving a larger RV.


2020 DMV regulations: states that require a non-commercial special license include

  • California: Class B license required over 26,000 lb or over 40 feet; Class A license required for towing over 10,000 lbs

  • Maryland: Class B license required over 26,000 lb

  • Michigan: Recreational Double “R” Endorsement required to tow a fifth wheel plus a trailer (it’s unlikely that you’ll ever need this)

  • North Carolina: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class A license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Nevada: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class A license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb; “J” Endorsement required to tow a vehicle over 10,000 lb (if the combined weight is less than 26,000 lb)

  • New York: Recreational Vehicle or “R” endorsement required for vehicles over 26,000 lb

  • Pennsylvania: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; equired for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • South Carolina: Class E license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class F license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Texas: Class B license required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; Class A license required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Wyoming: Class B license required for vehicle over 26,000 lb and towing under 10,000 lb; Class A license required for vehicle over 26,000 lb and towing over 10,000 lb

2020 DMV regulations: states that require a commercial drivers license (CDL) include

  • Arkansas: CDL required for vehicle over 26,000 lb

  • Connecticut: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Hawaii: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Kansas: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • New Mexico: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Washington, D.C.: CDL (Class B) required for single vehicle over 26,000 lb; CDL (Class A) required for multiple vehicles with combined weight over 26,000 lb

  • Wisconsin: CDL required over 45 feet

States That Do Not Require a Special License Include

Alabama (Ala. Code § 32-6-49.7) Montana (§ 61-1-101, MCA.)

Alaska (AS § 28.90.990) Nebraska (Neb. Rev. Stat. § 60-465)

Arizona (Ark. Code § 28-3102) New Hampshire (N.H. § Saf-C 1801.02)

Colorado (Colo. Rev. Stat. § 42-2-402) New Jersey (N.J. Rev. Stat § 39:3-10.11)

Delaware (Del. Admin. Code tit. 2 § 2213) North Dakota (N.D.C.C. § 39-06.2-06)

Florida (Fla. Stat. § 332.53) Ohio (Ohio Rev. Code § 4506.3)

Georgia (OCGA § 40-5-142) Oklahoma (47 O.S. § 1-107.4)Idaho (I.C. § 49-302)

Oregon (Or. Rev. Stat § 801.208) Illinois (625 ILCS § 5/6-500)

Rhode Island (31 R.I. Gen. Laws § 10.3-16) Indiana (CDL Manual)

South Dakota (S.D. Codified Laws § 32-9-3) Iowa (Iowa Code §321.176A)

Tennessee (T.C.A § 55-50-102) Kentucky (KRS § 281A-050 and CDL Manual)

Utah (Utah Code § 53-3-102) Louisiana ( LSA-RS § 32:408)

Vermont (23 V.S.A § 39-4103) Maine (29A M.R.S § 1252 and CDL manual)

Virginia (Code § 46.2-341.4) Massachusetts (DMV.org)

Washington (RCW 46 25-050) Minnesota (Minn. Stat. § 169.011 or driver’s manual)

West Virginia (W. Va. Code § 17E-1) Mississippi (Miss. Code § 63-1-203)

Missouri (MO Rev Stat § 302.775)


Still unsure?

When in doubt or need more information contact your local DMV to figure out what requirements are in your state when driving your RV.




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